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MIL-STD-1275 Power Supplies

Key Insights into MIL-STD-1275 Power Supplies for Military and Civilian Applications

Key Insights into MIL-STD-1275 Power Supplies for Military and Civilian Applications

Power supplies specifically designed for military ground vehicle use must adhere to the stringent requirements outlined in MIL-STD-1275E. While these power supplies are primarily intended for use in defense ground systems, they also find application among civilian manufacturers producing heavy machinery and off-road vehicles in need of robust and dependable power solutions. Given the harsh conditions often encountered by ground vehicles, such as humidity, dust, and sandy terrain, the design of MIL-STD-1275 power supplies must be attuned to environmental challenges. Moreover, these power supplies must exhibit resilience against the shock and vibration inherent to rough terrains.

Understanding MIL-STD-1275:

MIL-STD-1275 delineates the 28Vdc characteristics that are uniform across military ground vehicles, specifically at the input terminals of electrical and electronic equipment connected to the distribution network. This standard foster uniformity across various vehicle platforms. Designers of power systems are responsible for ensuring that the 28Vdc power delivered to utilization equipment complies with the standard, while equipment designers must ensure their products function correctly when connected to the power distribution network.

The inception of MIL-STD-1275A took place in September 1976, introducing multiple requirements addressing issues like spikes, steady-state conditions, surges, and ripple in ground vehicle power sources. These requirements served to complement the power systems and utilization equipment compliance specified in MIL-STD-461. The procuring authority was entrusted with defining the expected performance of equipment during and following any power supply disturbances.

Subsequently, the revision MIL-STD-1275B was published in November 1997, updating requirements and incorporating fault condition limits for assessment.

In June 2006, MIL-STD-1275C was released, revising requirements and notably expanding the temperature range criteria for compliance. The new evaluation temperature range extended from -45°C to +82°C, compared to the prior range of -32°C to +52°C. This revision also introduced references to SAE standards to address electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and supplement MIL-STD-461 requirements. For instance, it introduced ESD testing, which was not a stipulation in MIL-STD-461.

MIL-STD-1275D, issued in August 2006, introduced a few changes in requirements and definitions. Notably, it reinstated the temperature range evaluation to -32°C to +52°C. Moreover, the exemption from conducted emission compliance for vehicle power systems was updated to apply only to CE102 compliance.

In March 2013, the most recent revision, MIL-STD-1275E, was released. It established an evaluation temperature range at ambient conditions (+23°C ±5°C) but allowed for extreme temperature evaluations as deemed necessary by the approving authority.